Archive for May, 2011

Where’s the Path?

26 May 2011

I have just been shown a great website called Where’s The Path. Enter a location or postcode in the box in the top left hand corner and the screen will display the OS map on the left and a Google Earth aerial photo view on the right. Very useful for comparing map data to what is really on the ground.

For a more detailed explanation, Tim Rylands, (who always seems to be one step ahead of the game!) has relatively recently discovered it and shared it  too! 

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BBC History Domesday Project

13 May 2011

This is the second of two posts today, highlighting History websites, both of which were recommended by the Naace Newsletter.

In 1986 the BBC launched an ambitious project to record a snapshot of everyday life across the UK for future generations. A million volunteers took part to create a country wide, crowd-sourced digital Domesday book, combining maps and user-generated photos. Now, 25 years later you can explore the archive online, see the pictures, update the information and make your mark on this fascinating record of our collective history. Visit www.bbc.co.uk/history/domesday

domesday-project

Free access to 1911 census for schools

13 May 2011

In March 2011 the great census took place and schools connected to the National Education Network (which includes SWGfL) have been given free access to the 1911 census online. Until the end of the Summer term (31 July 2011) findmypast.co.uk is offering schools free access to research the 1911 census online database. N.B. Free searching for NEN registered users is restricted to the 1911 census section. This service is NOT available from home.  For further details click here.findmypast_football_advert

Climate Choices – Children’s Voices

11 May 2011

Climate Choices – Children’s Voices is aimed at teachers of children aged 9-11 years (Years 5 and 6) who want to help children begin to understand the challenging and complex issue of climate change. It is full of excellent information which is linked to real people.

climate